Edition: Sept 2019


A MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN

 

- Marshfield School District AODA Coordinator Services

Held Hostage

For the 2019-20 school year, the School District of Marshfield filled a new position, District AODA (Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse) Coordinator. It is important to clarify that while this role is held by a licensed school counselor, the AODA Coordinator is not licensed to provide alcohol and drug counseling to students. Rather, the AODA Coordinator will spearhead other district efforts related to AODA education and prevention, such as:

  • Biennial Administration of the YRBS (Youth Risk Behavior Survey) to grades 8-12 and coordination of district team action-planning and goal-setting in response to YRBS results
  • Managing district AODA programs, interventions, and data associated with these programs
  • SBIRT (Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment) implementation
  • Developing consistency and congruence of district-approved AODA language and policies to enhance student, staff, and parent understanding and cooperation
  • Write and manage grant funding, when appropriate, related to AODA needs
  • Community outreach and connection with AODA-related providers such as licensed alcohol and drug counselors, treatment facilities, legal services, and law enforcement
  • Promotion of prevention and awareness campaigns to combat abuse and misuse of substances
  • Co-advising the MCLA (Marshfield Columbus Leadership Alliance.) This student group, affiliated with MACY, promotes positive peer influences and healthy lifestyle choices at the high school level.

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Ask Marshfield Police Department......

Question: How does the MPD and District AODA Coordinator collaborate?

 

Because the District AODA Coordinator Position is new, in terms of having a person designated to devote significant time to it each week, the goal is that collaboration will increase from what may have been possible in the past. The AODA Coordinator will sit on the MACY Drug Task Force and will have the opportunity for daily interaction and collaboration with the Marshfield High School - School Resource Officer. The MPD will offer valuable, timely insight into state and local substance-use trends and emerging issues, which will inform and help guide the AODA Coordinator toward relevant programming and interventions.

 

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.



Know Meth


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Edition: August 2019

 

What is in our Waste? Identifying Items Discarded from a Meth Lab

 

- MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN

 

When methamphetamine is produced on a local level it is usually created using a “shake and bake” or “one pot” method.  Many times the containers and chemicals used in producing it are discarded either along the road or near where the substance was made. Items used in the methamphetamine making process can be extremely harmful. 


script 8

 

Here is what you may find:

 

  • Plastic or rubber tubing with hoses and clamps
  • Rubber gloves
  • Containers with rubbing alcohol, acetone, brake fluid, paint thinner, drain cleaner, engine starting fluid or camping fuel in it
  • Bedsheets or pillowcases stained red or containing a white powdery residue
  • Lithium batteries that appear to be unrolled
  • Cat litter
  • Respirator masks
  • Containers of sulfuric, muriatic or phosphoric acid
  • Medicine boxes or blister packs from over the counter cold and asthma medicines, pill residue (putty looking substance pink to red in color)
  • Plastic soda bottles or glass cookware with rubber hoses attached

 

Methamphetamine is a growing problem in Marshfield. In 2018, the Marshfield Police Department seized 52.33 grams of methamphetamine. In 2019, the Marshfield Police Department has seized over 178 grams of methamphetamine to date. Below you will find ways to help educate the community and help with this growing problem. 

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Ask Marshfield Police Department......

Question: What should I do if I find methamphetamine waste?

If you come across what appears to be waste from a meth lab, do not attempt to handle it yourself.   Contact law enforcement immediately via telephone or the P3 app with your location and a description of the items you found.  Due to the heavy use of chemicals in the making and processing of methamphetamine, there are major health risks. Methamphetamine waste can produce chemical burns from ammonia and other various chemicals associated with the waste it produces. According to the Minnesota Department of Transportation, respiratory damage can also occur from the fumes that are associated with the waste.  Explosions from containers are of concern and can result in third degree burns.  If injury should occur, administer first aid and call 911 immediately.

 

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.





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Edition: July 2019

 

In Plain Sight

 

- A MARSHFIELD CLINIC HEALTH SYSTEM - CENTER FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVANCEMENT AND MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN


Know Meth     Held Hostage

In Plain Sight is a display of a typical teenager’s bedroom containing hidden or disguised alcohol and other drug use items.  This display is a tool to help parents/guardians, extended family members, educators, and other adults that work with youth identify the early signs of risky behavior.  Adults (21 and older) are encouraged to learn about common indicators including paraphernalia, brands, slang, products, and more that are tied to drug culture. 

Not only is this display helpful in learning about alcohol and drug culture, but trainers will also provide participants with tools and resources that can help them have meaningful conversations with youth about alcohol and other drug use. Often times, adults believe that having this conversation once is enough, but keeping an open, honest, and calm dialog on the subject is key to preventing youth use. 

Individuals are far more likely to have problems with substances later in life if they begin using in their teenage years when their brains are in a critical stage of development.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are an estimated 200 drug overdose deaths per day in the U.S.  This number can be compared to the number of individuals on a standard commercial airplane flight.  Many of those overdose deaths are attributed to opioids (e.g. prescription painkillers, heroin, fentanyl), but it is common for individuals with a substance use disorder to have started their substance use in adolescents with alcohol, tobacco, or marijuana, and go on to use multiple substances throughout the span of the disease.

Don’t miss your chance to visit the Wood County In Plain Sight display at the Central Wisconsin State Fair! The display will be located at the Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) booth in the white expo building. This display is an effort of Healthy People Wood County, a movement of community residents and organizations focusing on county resident’s top identified health priorities (alcohol and other drug use, mental health, early growth and development, and health activity and food environments). For questions or to request a showing of this display, contact Wood County Health Department at (715) 421-8911.


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Ask Marshfield Police Department......

Question: Can parents be charged for drugs or paraphernalia found in their child’s possession (bedroom, backpack, pockets, etc.)?

 

If a parent/guardian finds what they suspect is an illegal drug or paraphernalia, they should call law enforcement for disposal (specifically Wood County Dispatch: 715-421-8700).  Technically a parent could be charged, but most law enforcement agencies are willing to work with families to confiscate illegal substances.  Charges may be filed against the youth depending on the situation, such as the amount of substance seized. 

Law Enforcement programs such as Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) exist in some communities as a pre-arrest diversion program to help individuals struggling with substance use disorder and their families to get connected to resources for treatment rather than face incarceration. Wood County currently does not have a PAARI program or a juvenile diversion program in place.  Supporting these types of programs build stronger communities by keeping taxpayer dollars down, reducing crime rates, and providing support and treatment to those struggling with addiction.

 

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.





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Edition: June 2019

 

Boating While Under the Influence

 

- A MARSHFIELD CLINIC HEALTH SYSTEM - CENTER FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVANCEMENT AND MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN

Held Hostage

Many people enjoy spending time during the summer at local lakes. If you are someone who enjoys the water, you need to know Wisconsin’s laws on being under the influence and boating.

So can you drink alcohol or be under the influence of drugs and drive a boat? The answer is No. Wisconsin law prohibits anyone from operating a motorboat, manipulating water skis, a surfboard or similar devices while under the influence of alcohol or drugs. This means that it is illegal for a person to be under the influence of an intoxicant or controlled substance or to have a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08% or greater.

But can you drink on a boat if you are not driving? While alcohol consumption is not illegal while boating, boat operators should be aware of the laws and potential penalties for operating the vessel while under the influence.

 

For more information, view the Handbook of Wisconsin Boating Laws and Responsibilities found at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources Website.

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Ask Marshfield Police Department......

Question: Who is responsible for enforcing boating laws in Wisconsin?

 

Wisconsin conversation wardens, county sheriffs and municipal police can enforce boating laws. Under Wisconsin law, if found guilty of operating a boat or similar device under the influence, you can be charged with Boating Under the Influence (BUI). A BUI is a lot like driving under the influence; if you’re impaired, police can stop you while you’re driving your boat. They can give you a chemical breath test, ask you to participate in field sobriety tests, and even arrest you from your boat. According to the Department of Natural Resources, anyone who operates or attempts to operate any type of boat is deemed to have given consent to an alcohol or drug test. Penalties for a BUI, can include fines and jail time.

 

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.





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Edition: May 2019

 

Marijuana Concentrates: Butane Hash Oil

 

- A MARSHFIELD CLINIC HEALTH SYSTEM - CENTER FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVANCEMENT AND MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN

 

Butane Hash Oil (BHO) is concentrated Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) that has been extracted from the marijuana flower, or bud.  It is extracted by forcing butane lighter fluid through the plant material and filtering into a catch pan.  The butane is then evaporated off and the resin that’s left in the catch pan is what is called BHO.

 

BHO contains approximately 90-98% THC.  Typical high grade marijuana, or the buds that are used for BHO extraction, generally contain approximately 20-25% THC.  Marijuana that was used several years ago, or what has been called the            “hippie days”, contained approximately 5% THC.

 

BHO is used by smoking it in a “rig”, diluting it and smoking it in vaporizers, and adding it to food.

 

The high, or psychedelic effect, from BHO is much stronger and longer lasting than the high from using typical high grade marijuana.  Reports from users indicate they get “more bang for their buck” which attributes to the recent trend.

 

According to the 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, taken by 562 10th & 12th grade students from public and private Marshfield schools, 23% of students reported using marijuana in their lifetime. Efforts are being taken by local youth substance abuse prevention coalition, MACY, to lower these numbers. In the 2018-2019 school year, students received curriculum on vaping and marijuana. Students learned the dangers of using these substances and resources for those addicted and wanting to quit.

 

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Ask Marshfield Police Department......

Question: Has there been an increase in vaping and using BHO in schools?

 

According to reports from School Resource Officers, there has been a significant increase in vaping nicotine by underage students.  Vape pens are easily concealed and have are a wide variety of flavors available. This makes it more appealing to young individuals.  Vape pens contain a high concentration of nicotine which also creates a high susceptibility to addiction.

 

School Resource Officers are also seeing an increase in BHO in the schools.  Nicotine is replaced by BHO in vape pens and smoked like a nicotine cartridge.  There is little-to-no odor emitted from the vape pens which makes them easily concealable.

 

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.





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Edition: April 2019

The Impact of Marijuana Legalization

 

- A MARSHFIELD CLINIC HEALTH SYSTEM - CENTER FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVANCEMENT AND MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN

 

Marijuana is the most widely used illicit drug in the US. It is estimated that 9% of people who use marijuana will become dependent upon it. This number increases for those who start using in their youth. The growing acceptance of marijuana among the public and policymakers is contributing to the opinion that marijuana use is harmless or less harmful in comparison to the use of alcohol and tobacco. However, studies show long-term effects of marijuana use include altered brain development and cognitive impairment. (American Society of Addiction Medicine).

The Central Wisconsin Drug Task force seized just over 18,000 grams (approx. 39.5 lbs) of marijuana in 2017. In 2018, this amount nearly tripled, seizing just over 54,000 grams (approx. 119 lbs). In addition, the Marshfield Police Department seized 6 plants in 2018. According to the 2017 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (taken by 562 10th & 12th grade students from Marshfield Public and Private Schools), 13% of Marshfield area High School students reported using marijuana at least once in the past 30 days; 23% used marijuana during their lifetime.

States that have legalized marijuana have seen significant negative consequences including increased: illegal use of marijuana by minors, traffic accidents and traffic deaths as a result of driving under the influence of marijuana, emergency room visits with marijuana related overdoses, number of hospitalizations from the use of marijuana, and risk of addiction and use of other more lethal drugs. The National Institutes of Health reports 1 out of every 6 adolescents who try marijuana will develop an addiction.

Interested in learning more? Join us, Tuesday, May 14th from 6-7:30pm in the Marshfield High School auditorium to watch Chronic State: How Marijuana Normalization Impacts Communities. This documentary addresses the impacts of normalization, legalization, and commercialization of marijuana. To RSVP, click on the following link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FDF7LH2. For questions, contact Meagan Pichler at 715-221-8422 or pichler.meagan@marshfieldclinic.org

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Ask Marshfield Police Department......

Question: What challenges do law enforcement encounter?

 

Law enforcement is frequently challenged with detecting whether or not there is legal justification in arresting and requesting charges on individuals possessing controlled substances.  Legalization and decriminalization of marijuana poses several significant challenges some of which include: operating motor vehicles while under the influence of marijuana, calls for service involving domestic situations, drug endangered child cases, mental health calls for service, and theft complaints.  Currently, law enforcement is able to hold individuals accountable for marijuana related offenses which, in most cases, is a deterrent to use and possession.

 

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.




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Edition: March 2019

 

kNOw Meth: Wisconsin Sees 500% Increase in Meth Use

 

- A MARSHFIELD CLINIC HEALTH SYSTEM - CENTER FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVANCEMENT AND MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN

Methamphetamine is on the rise in Wisconsin. The state has seen a 500% increase with Wood County seeing a 300% increase in meth use. According to the Youth Risk Behavior Survey, taken by 1,309 Wood County High School students, 2.8% reported using methamphetamine in the past 30 days. Wood County is ranked among the top 6 counties in Wisconsin to report methamphetamine cases to the Wisconsin State Crime Lab for analyzation. In 2016, Wood County submitted 72 cases.

A prevention and awareness campaign, announced summer of 2018, addresses the rise in use. Campaign materials were developed in partnership by the following: former Attorney General Brad Schimel, Marshfield Clinic Health System, Northwoods Coalition, and the Alliance for Wisconsin Youth.

Campaign messaging shows beloved Wisconsin symbols in an “Altered State.” The idea is to empower people to imagine scenarios in which all the things we love best about Wisconsin begin to rot — similar to what happens to a meth user’s body and life when they become addicted — and then inspire them to take preventive action. Communities are encouraged to use campaign messaging to continue conversations around the dangers of methamphetamine use.

Local youth substance abuse prevention coalition, MACY, is taking aim at the rising concern by adopting campaign materials. Messaging can be seen on billboards throughout Marshfield, beginning April 1st and continuing through the end of the month.

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Ask Marshfield Police Department......

Question: What is methamphetamine?

Methamphetamine is a highly addictive stimulant drug that is made from pseudoephedrine (cold medicine) tablets, water, lithium from batteries, anhydrous ammonia, lye (sodium hydroxide) and solvents. Common street or drug culture names include: meth, chalk, crank, crystal, glass, ice and speed.

 

Wisconsin’s main source of meth is being trafficked from Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota to northwestern Wisconsin. Generally, meth can be found in the form of pills or a white or cloudy powder, while crystal meth is similar to clear glass shards or shiny blueish white rocks. Law enforcement in Wisconsin has reported seeing blue, pink, orange and brown meth.

 

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.




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Edition: February 2019

 

Meth & Children: The Effects  

 

- A MARSHFIELD CLINIC HEALTH SYSTEM - CENTER FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVANCEMENT AND MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN


Know Meth

Methamphetamine is on the rise in Wisconsin. The state has seen a 500% increase. Closer to home, Wood County has seen a 300% increase. Those most affected by the surge in methamphetamine use is some of our most vulnerable community members: children.

 

According to a study out of the University of Kansas- School of Medicine, 80-97% of meth exposure, for children, is absorbed through the skin from either carpet or linoleum flooring. Only about 3% of methamphetamine exposure is digested.  Immediate effects of exposure may include: altered mental state, tachycardia, hypertension, vomiting, uncontrolled crying, seizures, and/or rapid eye movements.

 

In meth homes, children are susceptible to physical abuse, malnutrition and neglect, sexual abuse, out of home placement, domestic abuse, and child abandonment. Chronic effects may include: failure to thrive, poor growth, speech delays, sensory integration issues, cognitive delays, tantrums, aggression, attention problems, and/or social maladjustment. These effects are attributed to lack of appropriate stimulation and toxic abuse to specific areas of the brain.

As a community, it is our duty to protect those most vulnerable to abuse and neglect. If you know someone who is struggling with a substance abuse disorder, please contact your local social services and/or doctor.



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Ask Marshfield Police Department......

Question: What is a Drug Endangered Child (DEC)?

 

A drug endangered child is any child under 18 including  unborn, who is or has been exposed to dangerous drugs, paraphernalia, needles and /or toxic chemicals associated with the manufacturing of dangerous drugs; who live in an environment where dangerous drugs are used, manufactured and/or sold; and those children who have experienced or been threatened with physical harm or neglect as a result of their caretaker’s exposure or involvement in dangerous drugs.

 

Communities throughout Wisconsin form DEC committees to be proactive in addressing this issue. They meet to form a comprehensive approach that puts the needs of the children first. DEC is a National initiative. The Wisconsin Alliance for Drug Endangered Children formed in 2004 and currently has 53 active committees. Wood County has a DEC committee that meets regularly to review cases and protocols. For more information, contact the Wood County Sheriff’s Department.   

 

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.


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Edition: January 2019

Support vs. Enable:

The Do’s and Don’ts of Supporting a Loved One with a Substance Use Disorder

 
-A MARSHFIELD CLINIC HEALTH SYSTEM - CENTER FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH ADVANCEMENT AND MARSHFIELD AREA COALITION FOR YOUTH COLUMN


Held Hostage             Know Meth

 With drug use on the rise and the opioid epidemic in full force, it is very likely that you may know someone with a Substance Use Disorder (SUD). Supporting someone with a SUD can be difficult, at times. We care for that person and we want them be okay. However, there is a fine line between enabling and supporting.


Enable Addiction


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Ask The Marshfield Police Department......

Question: What happens when I report a loved one?      

Making the decision to report a loved one for substance use can be a very difficult one, but the right one.  Enabling a loved one’s substance use not only deepens their addiction, but is very hard on loving family members.  Reporting a loved one’s substance use to law enforcement, when other attempts to help have failed, is being supportive of a path to recovery. 

When submitting a report to Marshfield Police Department, each report is evaluated on a case by case basis.  A decision may be made to refer criminal charges of an adult to the District Attorney’s Office or a juvenile referral to Human Services for a child under the age of 17.  If either referral is made, those agencies, again, have an opportunity to evaluate on a case by case basis.  Factors often evaluated at each step include: individuals’ past history, facts surrounding the current situation, and/or the evaluation of other alternatives. Alternatives could include, but are not limited to, Adult Drug Treatment Court or a diversion program to support youth.  

Marshfield Area Coalition for Youth (MACY) is helping make Marshfield the best place to live and raise a family. MACY’s Drug Task Force is striving to reduce and prevent prescription drug abuse, heroin and methamphetamine use. MACY is supported by more than 200 members representing over 35 organizations in Marshfield.